• Khia

B.I.A. Black in AmeriKKKa

With the ridiculousness of this Black Lives Matter versus All Lives Matter ordeal it makes me think that maybe these All Lives Matter and Blue Lives Matter shouters just don't understand what it is like to be Black in America in 2018. I mean of course they don't know because the majority of them are not black themselves but I also feel that a lot of them do not make a conscious effort to understand.


A lot of our melanin-less friends would like to believe that because we are no longer in the field picking cotton and getting whipped by our masters or walking outside seeing our family members hanging from trees for public humiliation, racism is dead and we have been miraculously placed on a level playing field. However, this is not true and I just wanted to highlight some of the things that we face on a daily that makes our experiences different. Keep in mind that this is not an exhaustive list, nor is this meant to represent black people individually, because all of our experiences are different.





1. Being the only brown person in the room

For all of my life I have attended predominately white schools and been employed by predominately white workplaces and this never gets more comfortable. Particularly with all of the racist acts that have happened in the past few years, I think my senses are now heightened. I feel even more alone and outcasted now than I ever have. Now that the people that were undercover racists are feeling more comfortable with verbalizing their racist remarks I begin to wonder what are people thinking. And honestly, they may not be thinking anything, but it is the feeling of isolation that can be overwhelming. Most of the time a white person does not have to walk around and look to see if there are others that look like them in the room. It is absolutely isolating and unexplainably awkward and lonely sometimes.


2. Having to fight for rights that are given to others freely

Here we go again with the controversy (it's okay I don't mind). Colin Kaepernick is an excellent current example of this, as well as all of the black men and women that have been killed by law enforcement officers. What Colin Kaepernick did was sit down because he saw an injustice and decided to use his celebrity to bring notice to the issue, just as we have been begging other celebs to do. People have burned jerseys with this man's name on it, they have absolutely slandered his name, and so much more, for not pledging allegiance for a flag and a song that were never meant for his freedom anyway. People say that it was a disrespect to this country but how is it respectful to this country to be seriously considering Donald Trump as a president? A lot of people are trying to bring veterans into the conversation but how many of our beloved veterans are being failed by this country right now and living on the streets? I don't care if he sat down because he was sitting because he was tired, he does not have to stand up for a country that is not standing up for his race right now. This is something that has been going on in this country for centuries. People have tried to tell minorities where we can sit, where we can eat, which water fountain to drink out of, where to live, and so much more from the beginning of time. It is 2016 and it is still not okay for a person of color to stand up for what is right.




3. We have to work 10x's harder

Blacks in America have to work 10x's harder to prove how smart we are; that we are not just athletic or entertainment spectacles. White people all around this country paid plenty money to see Kobe Bryant's last game but are against any progression as far as education, employment, and status. As we have seen voluminously in the past couple years, we have have to fight 10x's as hard to prove that our lives matter, that it is not okay for our children, husbands, fathers, brothers, uncles, and cousins to be murdered by the people that have been sworn in to serve and protect ALL people. It has amazed me that since the beginning of the Black Lives Matter Movement how many people have disputed that fact.